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Raised Bed GardensRaised Bed Gardens Introduction So you want a vegetable garden, but don't have a large area to till up for the project? Your “soil” is hard as rock? A good way to compensate for such lack of space and rocky soil is by gardening in raised beds. Doing so helps you overcome problems with our less-than-perfect soil. A raised bed for vegetables...

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Lowering your Heat Bill This WinterLowering your Heat Bill This Winter [caption id="attachment_3155" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Replace old and worn weatherstrip in doors to reduce heat loss and drafts[/caption]     [caption id="attachment_3157" align="aligncenter" width="504"] 2. Seal baseboards and caulk windows. This is especially an issue with older homes...

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Winter Storm Fact SheetWinter Storm Fact Sheet A major winter storm can be lethal. Preparing for cold weather conditions and responding to them effectively can reduce the dangers caused by winter storms. Be familiar with winter storm warning messages. (See Winter Storm Watches and Warnings) Service snow removal equipment and have rock salt on hand to melt ice...

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Winterizing Your GearWinterizing Your Gear On equipment with plastic fuel tanks drain the tanks before storage. Conversely, you should fill metal fuel tanks to prevent them from rusting. In either case, drain the carburetor bowl. Generally, equipment managers "winterize" equipment to increase or maintain performance in winter or prevent problems after long periods...

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Court Ruling Will Likely End California’s Concealed Carry LawsCourt Ruling Will Likely End California’s Concealed... Well, well, it looks like Christmas might have came early for California gun owners. According to Fox News, a ruling today by the Ninth Court of Appeals has the possibility of ending Cali’s most restrictive concealed carry laws which determine when permits can be/are issued. From the Fox coverage Law-abiding...

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Homemade Granola Bar Recipes

Category : Equipment, Food

4ab630a00464200a89199fe740284a32I like granola bars. A good homemade granola bar can be very filling, easy to pack and you can pretty much make them with anything you want. Good for backpacking food or the school lunchbox. Here are a couple decent recipes for granola bars.

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Long Term Storage Of Dried Milk

Category : Equipment, Food

 powdermilkTypes of Nonfat Dry Milk

Regular and instant nonfat dry milk are made from skim milk that has been dried by spraying into hot air. Instant milk is regular milk which has been further processed causing it to clump together which results in a product that is easier to reconstitute with water than is regular nonfat dry milk. They both have the same nutrient composition. Regular nonfat dry milk is more compact and will require less storage space, however, it is harder to reconstitute. The most common type of dried milk to be found in grocery stores is instant nonfat dry milk. Dried whole milk may also be available, however because of the fat present, it will not store as well as nonfat dry milk. Dried buttermilk is available to be used in recipes calling for buttermilk. It will not keep quite as long as nonfat dried milk since is has a slightly higher fat level.
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Prepping on a Budget

3

Category : Equipment, General Info

Today was a flea market day. I found that if you bypass the row after row of crappy leather handbags and junk you’ll never really want to use anyway you can find the good stuff in the area that looks like a big yardsale/garage sale, most flea markets have these.

Today I picked up a Coleman 425 dual burner stove and a Coleman dual fuel 2 mantle lamp. The stove is about 15 years old, the lantern is about 10 years old.

For those that don’t know, Coleman has been making quality camping equipment for decades. I was first introduced to them (as most are) as a kid in cubscouts and camping with my gramps and dad. The best thing about the stoves is they are pretty much fool proof and generally always work. It generally takes a LOT to make a Coleman stove unserviceable and unless they are totally destroyed you can pick up rebuild kits for the burners/plumbing pretty cheap at any camping store or Wal-mart.
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Checklist for Family Preparedness

8

Category : Equipment, General Info

Create an Emergency Plan
l Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of fire, severe weather,
earthquakes, and other emergencies.
l Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.
l Discuss what to do about power outages and personal injuries.
l Draw a floor plan of your home. Mark two escape routes from each room.
l Learn how to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at main switches.
l Post emergency telephone numbers near telephones.
l Teach children how and when to call 911, police, and fire.
l Instruct household members to turn on the radio for emergency information.
l Pick one out-of-state and one local friend or relative for family members to call if separated by
disaster (it is often easier to call out-of-state than within the affected area).
l Teach children how to make long distance telephone calls.
l Pick two meeting places.
1. A place near your home in case of a fire.
2. A place outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after a disaster.
Take a Basic First Aid and CPR Class
l Keep family records in a water-and fire-proof container.
Prepare a Disaster Supplies Kit
l Assemble supplies you might need in an evacuation. Store them in an easy-to-carry container,
such as a backpack or duffle bag.
Include:
l A supply of water (one gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers.
Identify the storage date and replace every six months.
l A supply of non-perishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
l A change of clothing, rain gear, and sturdy shoes.
l Blankets or sleeping bags.
l A first aid kit and prescription medications.
l An extra pair of glasses.
l A battery-powered radio, flashlight, and plenty of extra batteries.
l Credit cards and cash.
l An extra set of car keys.
l A list of family physicians.
l A list of important family information; the style and serial number of medical devices, such as
pacemakers.
l Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.

Escape Plan

In a fire or other emergency, you may need to evacuate your house, apartment, or mobile home on a
moment’s notice. You should be ready to get out fast.
Develop an escape plan by drawing a floor plan of your residence. Using a black or blue pen, show the
location of doors, windows, stairways, and large furniture. Indicate the location of emergency supplies
(Disaster Supplies Kit), fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, collapsible ladders, first aid kits, and utility
shut off points. Next, use a colored pen to draw a broken line charting at least two escape routes from
each room. Finally, mark a place outside of the home where household members should meet in case of
fire. Be sure to include important points outside, such as garages, patios, stairways, elevators, driveways,
and porches. If your home has more than two floors, use an additional sheet of paper. Practice emergency
evacuation drills with all household members at least two times each year.

Home Hazard Hunt
l In a disaster, ordinary items in the home can cause injury and damage. Anything that can move,
fall, break, or cause a fire is a potential hazard.
l Repair defective electrical wiring and leaky gas connections.
l Fasten shelves securely.
l Place large, heavy objects on lower shelves.
l Hang pictures and mirrors away from beds.
l Brace overhead light fixtures.
l Secure water heater. Strap to wall studs.
l Repair cracks in ceilings or foundations.
l Store weed killers, pesticides, and flammable products away from heat sources.
l Place oily polishing rags or waste in covered metal cans.
l Clean and repair chimneys, flue pipes, vent connectors, and gas vents.
If You Need to Evacuate. . .
l Listen to a battery-powered radio for the location of emergency shelters.
l Follow instructions of local officials.
l Wear protective clothing and sturdy shoes.
l Take your Disaster Supplies Kit.
l Lock your home.
l Use travel routes specified by local officials.
If you are sure you have time …
l Shut off water, gas, and electricity, if instructed to do so.
l Let others know when you left and where you are going.
l Make arrangements for pets. Animals are not be allowed in public shelters.
Prepare an Emergency Car Kit Include:
l Battery powered radio and extra batteries
l Flashlight and extra batteries
l Blanket
l Booster cables
l Fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type)
l First aid kit and manual
l Bottled water and non-perishable high energy foods, such as granola bars, raisins and peanut
butter.
l Maps
l Shovel
l Tire repair kit and pump
l Flares
Fire Safety
l Plan two escape routes out of each room.
l Teach family members to stay low to the ground when escaping from a fire.
l Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire, feel the bottom of the door with
the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
l Install smoke detectors. Clean and test smoke detectors once a month.
l Change batteries at least once a year.
l Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken household members in case of fire.
l Check electrical outlets. Do not overload outlets.
l Purchase a fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type).
l Have a collapsible ladder on each upper floor of your house.
l Consider installing home sprinklers.

Portable Food Part (2)

1

Category : Food

The luster of the waxing moon illuminated our winter playground like a baseball diamond under the lights. Dinner, which had been in the works since we pitched camp, could wait while we had fun. We poured the hot chocolate into a Thermos, wrapped the pot of cooked rice in fleece and stuffed it into a sleeping bag to stay warm, then grabbed our skis. As we showed off our best telemark turns, the main course defrosted in my pocket.

We returned to camp exhilarated and downright starving. Sips of the still-steaming hot chocolate melted the ice off my handlebar mustache while I finished making dinner. From the “oven”-my coat pocket-came a beautiful chunk of sushi-grade ahi tuna. I sliced it quickly and whipped up sushi rolls and instant hot-and-sour soup. A sushi bar in the middle of Washington’s Mt. Baker Wilderness-who’d have thought?

That’s what I love about winter camping. You can eat food, lots of food, that would spoil in summer. Think about it: You’re hiking in a big freezer, so take advantage of it. Pack in zesty ground beef to spice up bean burritos. Breakfast comes complete with sausage links. You can even carry along a smoked turkey breast, instant stuffing, and gravy that tastes as good as Thanksgiving dinner.

Actually, you need this variety so you’ll consume enough calories to power you through days of carrying a heavy pack in cold conditions. Here are some menu suggestions.
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Examples of Primative Ovens

2

Category : Equipment, Food, General Info

www.prepperideas.com primative stone oven
www.prepperideas.com primative stone oven
There are two types of primitive ovens that you can build from natural materials, for survival cooking. The first type is a single chamber in which a fire is made, like in this example. The chamber can be made from rocks, adobe or mud bricks, or mud or clay over a crude form, such as an empty metal bucket, or a framework of sticks (that will be burned away at the first firing). This design works better with more mass, so the above example should be coated with a thick layer of clay, mud, or packed earth. To use, light and maintain a fire in the chamber for an hour or so, then remove the coals and put the food inside, where it will bake. Block the door with a rock, to trap more of the heat inside, for best results.
www.prepperideas.com primative stone oven
www.prepperideas.com primative stone oven
The second type is made with two chambers, a lower fire chamber, and an upper cooking chamber. Mass is less important in this design, as the fire is left burning while the food bakes in the cooking chamber. This type can also be made from rocks, or adobe, or can be earth-covered, and it can be constructed with an optional chimney. Metal plates can also be used as shelves.
www.prepperideas.com primative stove
www.prepperideas.com primative stove
Embankment oven: A similar oven can be made by digging a hole into sloping ground, or an embankment, as shown here, and then adding flat stone shelves, and a stone door, for draft control. Scrap metal plates (or metal road signs) also make good shelves for these types of ovens.
www.prepperideas.com primative ovens
Ammo Can Oven: Another style of two-chamber oven is the ammo can oven, which can be made from any large metal box with a lid. The can will be the upper chamber, or oven section. Stones (mortared with mud) are used to construct the lower chamber, or fire section, and then the can is placed on top, and covered with a thick layer of mud or adobe. An optional chimney hole can be used to draw the hot air around the back side of the box, for better heating. The ammo can lid is used as the door to the oven section, and as a shelf, if it is hinged and arranged as shown here.
www.prepperideas.com primitive oven
www.prepperideas.com primitive oven
www.prepperideas.com primitive oven
 Simple ovens can be made by first constructing a framework of sticks, and then adding a thick layer of mud, clay, or adobe (which is just mud mixed with chopped grass or straw). The sticks will burn away when the first fire is built inside, leaving the fire-hardened shell behind. A log or a bundle of sticks can be used to form a chimney, and flat stones (or slabs of green wood) can be used to block the doorway, both to regulate the fire, and to trap the heat inside.
www.prepperideas.com primative ovens
 www.prepperideas.com primative ovens
 These simple mud-brick, or adobe dome ovens can be built on raised platforms, if desired. These types of ovens have been used for centuries and are fool proof.
www.prepperideas.com primitive ovens
www.prepperideas.com primitive ovens
 Here is one way to make a primitive mud brick oven: Using pliable twigs or bundles of grasses, make a structure that resembles the shape of the pictures above. Make an adobe mix, from mud and grass. Plaster the mix all over the outside of the frame to a depth of two inches, or more. You can check the depth by pushing a stick through the wall. Smooth off the outside of the wall with a damp trowel, or similar improvised tool. Allow the structure to dry a little. Place wood and kindling inside the oven and light. Keep the fire going by adding more wood – but slowly, as you don’t want to ruin the oven with too much heat. You just want to harden the clay with a hot, but not fierce heat. When the oven is fully dried, and the sticks have been burned out, you can use  the oven for cooking.
www.prepperideas.com adobe brick
Another design uses mud and grass mixed into bricks, which are made in simple molds like the example shown below, allowed to dry some, then stacked into a dome, like an igloo. Ovens of this type can also be made from mud on a frame of rebar, wire mesh, a metal barrel, ammo cans, etc..
www.preperideas.com adobe brick
www.preperideas.com adobe brick
www.preperideas.com adobe brick
www.prepperideas.com primitive oven
 Rake the coals from a single-chamber oven, put the food inside, and then seal doorway with a rock, or a wooden door, to keep most of the heat inside.
www.prepperideas.com primitive oven
For long-term use, protect your mud-brick oven (and your firewood) from rain by covering it with a shed roof.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make your own MRE’s

1

Category : Equipment, Food, General Info

 

www.prepperideas.com MRE

Make your own MRE’s

One of the most important preparations for your bug out bag is your food. Deciding what and how much to carry can be a daunting task, since there are many factors to consider: Nutrition, Weight, Cooked or Non-Cooked, Pre-Packaged or homemade.
Depending on your geographical location, the need to carry water to reconstitute your freeze-dried super meals can add a considerable amount of weight to your bug out gear. This article is just to give you an idea of what works in my location. I live in western Washington, surrounded by forests, rivers and streams and you will likely run across water somewhere along your hike or bugout. Except in the summer, rain falls quite frequently so gathering water is mainly a matter of purifying it and containing it.

 

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My Food Storage 360 Meals – $670 ($1.50 per meal)

Category : Food

360 Serving Long Term Food Storage

Click the image to order and for more information!

 

 

1 Month Supply, 3 servings of food per day for 4 adults or 2 adults and 4 children. 4 Month Food Storage Supply, 3 servings a day for 1 adult.

This Food Storage Container Contains:

  • Honey Glazed Granola (40 servings)
  • Multi-Grain Cereal (40 servings)
  • Oatmeal (40 servings)
  • Beef Teriyaki and Rice (12 servings)
  • Cheesy Lasagna (12 servings)
  • Cheesy Macaroni (12 servings)
  • Chicken Ala King (12 servings)
  • Chicken Teriyaki and Rice (12 servings)
  • Creamy Chicken Pasta (12 servings)
  • Creamy Potato Soup (12 servings)
  • Creamy Tomato Basil Soup (12 servings),
  • Southwest Bean and Rice (12 servings),
  • Stroganoff (12 servings)

My Food Storage provides quality long term food.  My Food Storage specializes in the best quality, best prices online, and value giving you the peace of mind in an emergency situation. These food storage selection is approximately $1.50 per meal, and has a 25 Year Shelf Life. Adding hot water to these freeze dried gourmet meals will make them ready in minutes. It’s time to make the choice today to protect your most valuable asset, your family. After looking through the nutritional information for the food, they range from about 180 calories. to 300 calories per meal. Protein seems to average around 10 g. per meal, carbohydrates vary quite a bit. These are freeze dried meals and technically require hot water, but just canteen water will work in a pinch.

Purchase now and get this stove for FREE! (a $34.95 value)

Emergency Quick Stove

Click the image to order and for more information!

  • Cooks for 4-6 hours (1 week’s worth of cooking time)
  • Boils water in 5 minutes
  • Holds over 300 lbs
  • Stores indefinitely and safely (no chemicals)
  • Can be lit and re-lit

Safe – Non-explosive, non-hazardous, and clean-burning fuel means you can take it, store it, and cook on it wherever you need it. Because it is so much safer, there is no legal limit as to the quantity you can store in your home like there is for other fuels.

ReliableHas an indefinite shelf life and works great in extreme weather conditions. Fuel cells are completely waterproof and will ignite in seconds, making it great for emergencies, or for camping and other recreational uses.

Superior Performance – Boils water in less than five minutes and cooks for over an hour on a single fuel cell. Since most meals only require 15 minutes of cooking, that is almost 1 weeks worth of cooking. At up to 18,000 BTU’s, it burns hotter than most other outdoor stoves.

Convenient – Compact, lightweight, and ready for cooking in less than a minute. Includes fuel, platform, cooking rings and waterproof matches so it is ready when you need it.

Energy Efficient – Patented design conserves energy and increases heat output. Fuel cells can be extinguished and re-used as needed to maximize burn time.

Environmentally Conscious – Fuel cells are made of recycled, all natural materials.

Robust Solution – Highly efficient source for heating and lighting. Wide base for enhanced stability that can support over 300 lbs.

Flexible – Design and fuel cells that allow for multiple uses. Owners have found numerous innovative uses beyond what we imagined.

 

Get 1 Month Supply of Food for Four People and the Stove!

$670
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