Prev

Next

494 Convienient Meals In a Jar494 Convienient Meals In a Jar Meals canned for storage, ready to fix! 3 Grain Muffin Mix 7-Up Biscuits Mix 9 Bean Soup Mix A-B-C Muffin Base Mix Alfredo Noodles Mix All purpose Ground Beef Mix Almond Butter Beverage Mix Almond Pancake Mix Almond pancake mix #2 Almond Pancake Mix #3 Almost Lipton's Onion Soup Mix Anadama...

Read more

Ebola: What You Need to KnowEbola: What You Need to Know The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. A small number of cases in Lagos and Port Harcourt, Nigeria, have been associated with a man from Liberia who traveled to Lagos and died from Ebola, but the virus does not appear to have been widely spread in Nigeria. The case...

Read more

2 Weeks to Make a 3 month Food Supply2 Weeks to Make a 3 month Food Supply We encourage everyone worldwide to prepare for adversity in life by having a basic supply of food and water and some money in savings. We ask that you be wise as you store food and water and build your savings. Do not go to extremes; it is not prudent, for example, to go into debt to establish your food storage all at...

Read more

Gas Mask Selection Information - Need To KnowGas Mask Selection Information - Need To Know If terrorists really want to inflict the most harm, they would release bio-chem agents when people are at work or school. Most people will instinctively want to get home and they may expose themselves to more nasties in order to get there, dragging contaminants with them. It's logical if you live in a high profile metropolitan...

Read more

Making Fire With Flint/SteelMaking Fire With Flint/Steel In this method of fire-making, sparks are shaved off a piece of steel by striking it briskly with a piece of flint or other rock. In actual use, the steel is struck against the flint, since it's usually easier to do it that way. A piece of char-cloth is held against the flint (or other rock) to catch the sparks. Once a...

Read more

twitter

Checklist for Family Preparedness

8

Category : Equipment, General Info

Create an Emergency Plan
l Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of fire, severe weather,
earthquakes, and other emergencies.
l Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.
l Discuss what to do about power outages and personal injuries.
l Draw a floor plan of your home. Mark two escape routes from each room.
l Learn how to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at main switches.
l Post emergency telephone numbers near telephones.
l Teach children how and when to call 911, police, and fire.
l Instruct household members to turn on the radio for emergency information.
l Pick one out-of-state and one local friend or relative for family members to call if separated by
disaster (it is often easier to call out-of-state than within the affected area).
l Teach children how to make long distance telephone calls.
l Pick two meeting places.
1. A place near your home in case of a fire.
2. A place outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after a disaster.
Take a Basic First Aid and CPR Class
l Keep family records in a water-and fire-proof container.
Prepare a Disaster Supplies Kit
l Assemble supplies you might need in an evacuation. Store them in an easy-to-carry container,
such as a backpack or duffle bag.
Include:
l A supply of water (one gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers.
Identify the storage date and replace every six months.
l A supply of non-perishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
l A change of clothing, rain gear, and sturdy shoes.
l Blankets or sleeping bags.
l A first aid kit and prescription medications.
l An extra pair of glasses.
l A battery-powered radio, flashlight, and plenty of extra batteries.
l Credit cards and cash.
l An extra set of car keys.
l A list of family physicians.
l A list of important family information; the style and serial number of medical devices, such as
pacemakers.
l Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.

Escape Plan

In a fire or other emergency, you may need to evacuate your house, apartment, or mobile home on a
moment’s notice. You should be ready to get out fast.
Develop an escape plan by drawing a floor plan of your residence. Using a black or blue pen, show the
location of doors, windows, stairways, and large furniture. Indicate the location of emergency supplies
(Disaster Supplies Kit), fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, collapsible ladders, first aid kits, and utility
shut off points. Next, use a colored pen to draw a broken line charting at least two escape routes from
each room. Finally, mark a place outside of the home where household members should meet in case of
fire. Be sure to include important points outside, such as garages, patios, stairways, elevators, driveways,
and porches. If your home has more than two floors, use an additional sheet of paper. Practice emergency
evacuation drills with all household members at least two times each year.

Home Hazard Hunt
l In a disaster, ordinary items in the home can cause injury and damage. Anything that can move,
fall, break, or cause a fire is a potential hazard.
l Repair defective electrical wiring and leaky gas connections.
l Fasten shelves securely.
l Place large, heavy objects on lower shelves.
l Hang pictures and mirrors away from beds.
l Brace overhead light fixtures.
l Secure water heater. Strap to wall studs.
l Repair cracks in ceilings or foundations.
l Store weed killers, pesticides, and flammable products away from heat sources.
l Place oily polishing rags or waste in covered metal cans.
l Clean and repair chimneys, flue pipes, vent connectors, and gas vents.
If You Need to Evacuate. . .
l Listen to a battery-powered radio for the location of emergency shelters.
l Follow instructions of local officials.
l Wear protective clothing and sturdy shoes.
l Take your Disaster Supplies Kit.
l Lock your home.
l Use travel routes specified by local officials.
If you are sure you have time …
l Shut off water, gas, and electricity, if instructed to do so.
l Let others know when you left and where you are going.
l Make arrangements for pets. Animals are not be allowed in public shelters.
Prepare an Emergency Car Kit Include:
l Battery powered radio and extra batteries
l Flashlight and extra batteries
l Blanket
l Booster cables
l Fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type)
l First aid kit and manual
l Bottled water and non-perishable high energy foods, such as granola bars, raisins and peanut
butter.
l Maps
l Shovel
l Tire repair kit and pump
l Flares
Fire Safety
l Plan two escape routes out of each room.
l Teach family members to stay low to the ground when escaping from a fire.
l Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire, feel the bottom of the door with
the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
l Install smoke detectors. Clean and test smoke detectors once a month.
l Change batteries at least once a year.
l Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken household members in case of fire.
l Check electrical outlets. Do not overload outlets.
l Purchase a fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type).
l Have a collapsible ladder on each upper floor of your house.
l Consider installing home sprinklers.

Comments (8)